3 New Amazing Furikake Salmon Favorites

Furikake Salmon is a super simple dish with an elegant Japanese-Hawaiian flair. Salmon is topped with a flavor-filled creamy spread and seasoned with furikake, a Japanese all-purpose seasoning. It’s uncomplicated, but the flavors are wonderfully complex! And still gluten free!

Look no further for not one, but THREE easy ways to jazz up a weeknight dinner or a lunch prep dish in no time! Serve furikake salmon as a star entree, in a colorful rice bowl🍲, or topped on a beautiful salad 🥗. You’ll surely want to make all three!

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3 stacked images of furikake salmon fillet at top, furikake salmon salad in white bowl on rattan placemat in center, and furikake salmon rice bowl on rattan placemat at bottom

Salmon ranks as one of America’s most consumed seafood varieties, second only to the nation’s top choice – shrimp. And it’s no wonder that salmon heaps to the top of the fishing boat; it’s a luscious smooth-textured fish that adapts easily across many cuisines and many different prep methods. 

It can be transformed by so many different herbs, spices, and other ingredients (and wines), and salmon compliments countless delicious meal combinations when accompanied by a myriad of foods. So let’s experiment and have it often!

Plus, salmon is one of THE MOST nutritious proteins, many different species are sustainably-sourced and pretty easy to find, and most importantly to some…it’s terrifically easy to prepare!

In my household, we adore both salmon and shrimp, among other oceanic and freshwater foods, but salmon holds a special place in my dietitian heart. There are numerous compelling reasons to include this nutritious superstar into your weekly diet. But more on that later!

Discover just how easy furikake salmon is to prepare. And don’t be shy to make enough so you can enjoy all three of our new fabulous furikake favorites!

What is Furikake?

Furikake. It is not only a fun Japanese word, pronounced “fur · uh · kaa · kay,” but it is also a popular Japanese multi-purpose seasoning that instantly adds tons of flavor. Often sprinkled on top of rice, Furikake comes from a word that actually means, “to sprinkle over.” 

Here we use Nori Komi Furikake, which is just one of the several different varieties of furikake available today. It is a blend of black and white sesame seeds, dried nori (black seaweed), salt, and kelp powder. Some contain MSG, but I encourage you to find blends that do not.

Furikake is a nutty, salty, and umami fusion of flavors joined by an essence of the sea that mingles well with multiple types of foods.

The History of Furikake

Furikake has an interesting history. It is said that furikake was originally created to serve as a nutritional supplement during food shortages in Japan in the early 1900’s by the pharmacist, Suekichi Yoshimaru

Refined white rice was the predominant food source at that time. Through the production of  white rice, the nutritious bran and germ outer covering is stripped. This removal sadly takes away much of the grain’s rich nutrition benefits, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and fiber. 

Yoshimaru addressed widespread nutritional deficiencies by grinding fish bones with roasted sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and seaweed, to make a sprinkable product. It was marketed as Gohan no tomo or “a friend of rice” and used as a tasty medicinal additive topping for rice. 

Pretty cool! 😎

Fast forward to the 21st century, furikake has blossomed into several different flavorful varieties, providing much more than nutrition, but also versatile flavor combinations used to enhance foods from across the world. 

Some varieties contain bonito flakes, dried salmon, shrimp, or egg, shiso, or wasabi. (Some also contain sources of gluten, so do check food labels closely!)

Furikake quickly found a comfy home in Hawaiian cuisine and along the U.S. continental western coast and delights the palates of many, both young and old! This multi-purpose seasoning can be found in most Hawaiian homes, and one of its most loved uses is for furikake salmon!

How to Use Furikake 

Give it a shake, shake, shake! 

Beyond its use as a topping for rice and salmon, it is often used to enhance other baked and grilled fish, poké and sushi, poultry, meats and eggs, noodles, ramen, and pasta, potatoes, vegetables and salads, and even on pizza, on popcorn, and in snack mixes! 

Consider these other common uses for furikake:

  • Lightly as a savory garnish – add color and a umami briny crunch to poached, steamed, or fried fish, to rice or noodle dishes, or to steamed or roasted veggies (yummy on edamame).
  • As a topping – sprinkle on sushi or poké, or on avocado toast topped with a fried or poached egg!
  • As a seasoning – add a layer of rich flavor to an entire dish of soup, stew, rice, or ramen.
  • In a snack – add a pop of robust flavor to popcorn, roasted nuts, kale chips, or homemade Chex Mix.

Please be sure to examine furikake food labels for gluten. Not all furikake is gluten free! See recipe FAQ below for examples of preferred gluten free furikake products.

How to Buy High-Quality Salmon?

The salmon available to you will differ depending on where you live.

The big dilemma for many consumers in buying salmon relates to two main factors: nutrition and sustainability.

Which is Best to Buy – Farmed or Wild Salmon? 

The truth is that both have nutritional benefits and pitfalls. Both also can be produced in sustainable or unsustainable ways that are good, neutral, or bad for the environment and populations of fish. 

According to the Environmental Defense Fund, there are several safe sustainable choices of wild Alaskan salmon and some Atlantic farmed salmon that are good for humans and the environment.

And yes, you can find farmed fish that is sustainably raised. Look for the Marine Stewardship Council blue label on a product’s package. This label indicates that the salmon has been raised or caught using sustainable methods.

The best way to stay on top of which fish to ditch and which fish to dish is by regularly monitoring the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Salmon Buying Guide and comparing it to your local fish supply.

Wild Alaskan salmon species you may find include chinook (or king), chum, coho, pink, and sockeye and each is a great high-quality fish that comes from well-managed fisheries. They vary in color, nutrition, flavor and texture. 

Whether you try farmed salmon or wild Alaskan salmon, you may be surprised to find that you like one species more than another!

Fresh wild Alaskan salmon is sometimes hard to come by in land-locked states like Indiana. Fortunately, farmed Atlantic salmon are also great types of high-quality fish that are available; much of the U.S. supply is sourced from Chile, Canada, and Norway. 

How To Choose Fresh Fish

I prefer to buy fresh salmon fillets at the fresh meat and seafood counter in our local grocery store, typically the day of or just the day before I intend to cook it. The fresher the better!

Key details to note to when purchasing high-quality fresh fish include color, smell, and texture.

  • Color – Salmon should be a vibrant pink to red color (depending on species) and absent of dark-colored edges.
  • Smell – Salmon shouldn’t smell fishy, but rather like the ocean breeze – fresh and clean but slightly salty.
  • Texture – Salmon should be smooth and firm and also appear shiny, but not slimy.

NOTE: If you purchase frozen salmon, it is best for each piece to be vacuum packed and sealed for freshness. The color of each piece should be consistent and the package should not contain any ice crystals or frost.

How to Make the Best Furikake Salmon Recipe

Once you have purchased your salmon and have the other ingredients in stock at home, it truly is a quick and easy assembly! For complete step-by-step instructions to grill or bake furikake salmon, see the recipe card below. 

Here’s the list of the ingredients and kitchen tools you’ll need to make this divine furikake salmon!

Furikake salmon ingredients on foil lined tray, clockwise from top; 2 raw salmon fillets, glass bowl with dollops of olive-oil mayo, sriracha, wasabi paste, and green onion, tiny glass bowl with furikake blend, and small glass bowl with diced radish

Ingredients for Easy Furikake Salmon

  • Salmon Fillet – While I almost always prefer to use fresh salmon, thawed frozen salmon certainly can be used in this recipe as well.
    • Let this high omega-3 fatty fish be a weekly staple in your house and reap all it’s tasty nutritious goodness. Read more about why I recommend a weekly intake of salmon in the Nutrition Benefits section below.
  • Fresh Cracked Black Pepper – This household spice is more vibrant and powerful when ground from fresh than pre-ground pepper, but use what you have. Pepper will not only enhance the flavor of the fish, but it marries well with both the creamy layer and the furikake. 
  • Olive Oil Mayonnaise, Wasabi Paste, Sriracha Sauce & Green Onion- Some may think mayonnaise on salmon sounds weird, but it is the hallmark of this Hawaiian sensation.
    • Combined with the pungent spike from wasabi and the bit of fiery heat from the sriracha sauce, mayonnaise mellows them both. 
    • This 3-ingredient creamy combination along with the bright delicate flavors from green onions seals moisture within the salmon, adds incredible depth of flavor, and gives a place for the furikake to stick.
    • I use olive oil mayo or light mayo to help cut unnecessary calories and extra fat from this dish.
    • Be sure to check labels for gluten when purchasing wasabi paste and sriracha sauce.
      • *NOTE: Although Huy Fong Sriracha Sauce is not labeled as gluten free, the manufacturer’s allergen statement verifies that it does not contain gluten. 🙌🏼
  • Nori Kame Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning –The namesake that adds the nutty, salty, umami flavor fusion to this dish – but check for gluten free!
  • Radish – Finely chopped and used to garnish, it adds a lovely color contrast but also a random peppery crunch to this salmon. It is optional.

Some other furikake salmon recipes include soy sauce. Well, I tried that through developing this recipe…but it just made the salmon way too salty and nobody liked it. It took away from the delicate furikake flavors that danced so well with the velvety mayonnaise-salmon combination.

3-step Furikake Salmon Preparation Images, left to right: 1. raw salmon fillets on foil lined grill pan with bowl of creamy layer ingredients blended together on left and furikake seasoning in tiny bowl to left. 2. raw salmon fillets on foil lined grill pan topped with creamy layer spread to edges, tiny bowl of furikake to left. 3 raw salmon fillets on foil lined grill pan topped with creamy layer and sprinkled with furikake to edges

Equipment Used To Make Furikake Salmon

  • Grill Pan for Outdoor Grill or Baking Sheet (for oven method) – a sturdy surface to cook salmon.
  • Aluminum Foil – For easy clean up I use heavy-duty foil for use on the grill and standard aluminum foil for oven use.
  • Small Bowl – to combine the creamy layer ingredients

Make Enough Furikake Salmon for Delicious Leftovers!

I have to admit, I usually prefer salmon right off the grill or straight out of the oven. Sure – warming it up later in the week for a quick meal definitely has its advantages. My taste buds just don’t jump for joy like they do the first time around. 

Except in the case of leftover furikake salmon. It is no joke! It is truly phenomenal – especially when you serve it in one of the two new amazing recipes I developed below. I’m salivating just writing about them!

Two BONUS Gluten Free Salmon Recipes!!

Orange IG Graphic titled "Entree, Rice Bowl, or Salad" at the top center with square image of grilled furikake salmon fillet with a fish image to the left and a green round gluten free symbol to the right. Center is labeled "Amazing Furikake Salmon" with two square images beneath: to left assembled furikake salmon rice bowl on rattan placemat, to the right assembled furikake salmon salad on rattan placemat. Writing at bottom states,"topped with a light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette!"

Why not cook enough salmon to enjoy 3 different delicious ways? Cook it once and enjoy it multiple times as an entree, or in an awesome rice bowl, or on top of a divine salad. Don’t hesitate – you have got to try them all!

Once you have cooked the salmon (see recipe card for Easy Furikake Salmon near the end of this post), start by chopping up a few fresh veggies and whisk up the tasty Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette to drizzle on either one!

Then try my recipe for a Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl – or maybe you’re in the mood for my Furikake Salmon Salad recipe – you choose! The recipes are almost identical – the ONLY difference between the two is that one has rice and the other has lettuce.

Both taste fresh and awesome, and once again – are easy to make AND easy to eat!

Assembled Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl in white bowl on rattan placemat with 2 clementines in upper left. Contents of bowl clockwise from top:sliced green onion, red bell pepper strips, cucumber strips, shredded purple cabbage, avocado slices, brown rice with furikake salmon in center and garnished with diced radish.
Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl for ONE

Ingredients for One Rice Bowl

  • 4 ounces of cooked Furikake Salmon *reheated in microwave
  • 2/3 cup cooked brown rice (cooked in low-sodium vegetable stock)
  • 1/2 tsp Nori Komi Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning*
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced red cabbage (green is OK, too!)
  • 1/3 cup large matchstick-cut cucumbers
  • 1/4 cup large matchstick-cut red bell peppers
  • 1/4 medium avocado, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 green onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp finely chopped radish

To Assemble a Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl for ONE

Place rice in the center of a large individual serving bowl and sprinkle furikake seasoning evenly across the top; add cooked salmon to the center of the rice. 

Arrange sliced red cabbage, cut cucumbers, cut bell peppers, and sliced avocado in their own separate heaps around the outside of the bowl. Garnish with green onion and radish.

Drizzle Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette (recipe follows) over cut veggies and enjoy.

Nutrition for 1 Bowl + Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette for ONE

Calories: 573kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 35g | Fat: 29g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 9g | Monounsaturated Fat: 13g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 80mg | Sodium: 490mg | Potassium: 1304mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 2035 IU | Vitamin C: 77mg | Calcium: 85mg | Iron: 4mg

Assembled Furikake Salmon Salad in white bowl on rattan placemat. Contents of bowl clockwise from top: shredded purple cabbage, red bell pepper strips, cucumber strips, and avocado slices all on a bed of romaine lettuce with furikake salmon in center. Garnished with sliced green onion and diced radish.
Furikake Salmon Salad for ONE

Ingredients for One Salad

  • 4 ounces of cooked Furikake Salmon *reheated in microwave
  • 1 1/2 cups lightly packed torn Romaine or Butter lettuce
  • 1/2 tsp Nori Komi Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning*
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced red cabbage (green is OK, too)
  • 1/3 cup large matchstick-cut cucumbers
  • 1/4 cup large matchstick-cut red bell peppers
  • 1/4 medium avocado, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 green onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp finely chopped radish

To Assemble a Furikake Salmon Salad for ONE

Place lettuce in a large individual serving bowl and sprinkle furikake seasoning evenly across the top; add cooked salmon to the center of the lettuce. 

Arrange sliced red cabbage, cut cucumbers, cut bell peppers, and sliced avocado in their own separate heaps around the outside of the bowl. Garnish with green onion and radish.

Drizzle Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette (recipe follows) over cut veggies and enjoy.

Nutrition for 1 Salad +Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette for ONE

Calories: 438kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 32g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 9g | Monounsaturated Fat: 13g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 80mg | Sodium: 454mg | Potassium: 1445mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 8546 IU | Vitamin C: 77mg | Calcium: 91mg | Iron: 3mg

NOTES for Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl and Salad

*Reheat Salmon – When done improperly, reheating salmon in the microwave will result in dry fish. Place salmon portion on microwave-safe plate and reheat at 50% power for 30-40 seconds. Remove from microwave and gently flake salmon slightly with a fork. Place back in the microwave and cook on 80% power for 45-60 seconds until steaming and hot throughout.

*Nori Komi Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning – See Easy Furikake Salmon Fillet recipe card NOTES below for recommended gluten-free varieties.

Light Sesame Soy Vinaigrette for ONE

Ingredients

  • 1/8 tsp fresh cracked black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp Tamari light (50% less sodium)
  • 1 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp neutral oil like canola oil or avocado oil

Instructions

In a medium bowl, combine cracked black pepper, brown sugar, Tamari, and rice vinegar. Slowly whisk in sesame oil, dripping at first until emulsified, and repeat with neutral oil, whisking until completely blended. Use to drizzle on one delicious Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl or Salad.


Want a FREE printable e-cookbook complete with all three recipes from this post + BONUS content?

Get Your Copy of The Marching Apron Furikake Favorites e-cookbook. Click here!

Recipes INSIDE my FREE Furikake Favorites e-Cookbook!

  • Easy Furikake Salmon
  • Furikake Salmon Rice Bowls for ONE and FOUR
  • Furikake Salmon Salads for ONE and FOUR
  • Light Sesame Soy VInaigrette for ONE and FOUR
  • + MORE
  • All gluten-free!

Click the RED button to get your free copy emailed to you!

Grillmaster Top Tips for Grilled Salmon Success

The Grillmaster in our household is the one who inspired this food blog. Since we got married 20 years ago, my husband, Jason, is the better half who delighted himself in learning the artisan craft of grilling. And he does it well. Very well. 

As such, he was coined “The Grillmaster.” And such he has become. These are his experienced grillmaster tips for you when grilling salmon!

  • Measure the thickness of salmon fillets. Use the “general grilling reference times” for grilling salmon based on its thickness as written in the recipe card below. 
    • A thinner fillet may need to be placed inside the grill after a thicker one has already started cooking. This way they will both complete cooking at the same time.
  • Maintain a grilling temperature of 500°F. Allowing the temperature to rise and fall too much makes for uncertain grilling times for salmon success. Keep the temperature high and constant.
  • Keep the grill lid closed. You may want to peek, but unless you see flames, try not to open the lid and let that high heat escape. That will add length to the cooking time. Resist the urge!
  • Allow salmon to rest. Once it has been removed from the grill, the grillmaster will usually place grilled salmon inside the microwave for a warm place to just rest for a couple of minutes. (Don’t turn it on!)
    • It will continue to cook during this time on its own and the internal temperature will rise slightly. Allow it to rest to complete this step but also to give it time to seal in juices and prime time flavor!
  • Have Backup Fuel. When I turn on the oven I expect to have enough electricity to finish my cooking masterpiece. A gas grill has a finite amount of fuel it can use from the attached gas tank. Have another fuel tank on hand just in case your gas reservoir gets so low it runs out of fuel!

Nutrition Benefits

Salmon itself is incredibly nutritious. It’s just so impressive on so many levels despite its deliciousness. This infographic says it all (well, almost)!

Salmon Facts That Benefit You - Why Eating Salmon Often Matters (infographic) Salmon... 1. Contains the antioxidant astaxanthin, a carotenoid that may be connected to the health of the brain, heart, nervous system, and skin. 2. Is an excellent source of seven different B vitamins, which work together for optimal brain and nervous system function. 3. Is one of the the few natural food sources with high amounts of Vitamin D providing about 70% DV (Daily Value). 4. Is a good source of potassium, helping to manage blood pressure and reduce fluid retention. 5. Contains a whopping 75-85% DV for selenium, which is important for DNA production, reproduction, thyroid gland function, and protection from free radicals. 6. Is a great source of protein and provides 22-25 grams in one 3.5-ounce serving. Protein is the building block for every single cell in your body; it is necessary for repairing cells and to make new ones. 7.Though it varies across salmon species, farmed Atlantic salmon contains 2150 mg of omega-3’s in one 3.5 oz serving! Through research, the omega-3’s EPA and DHA have been associated with improvements in brain health, eye health, heart health, joint health, and in healthy aging, including prenatal, infant, and child health and development.

YES for that special fat! I❤️ Ω-3!

Salmon is known as a fatty fish. It’s packed with healthy polyunsaturated fats, such as the omega-3 fatty acids EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These are essential fats that humans cannot make in adequate amounts but are necessary for optimal health.

These essential fatty acids have also been shown to reduce inflammation and blood pressure and help lower the risk of some cancers, dementia, depression, heart disease, and arthritis.

In fact, both the American Heart Association and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that people of all ages have fish or seafood twice a week and strive to vary protein intake. This includes choices high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon.

Each serving of furikake salmon provides you with:

  • 234 calories
  • 28 grams of protein
  • 9 grams of healthy fats 
  • Only 170 grams of sodium
  • 718 grams of potassium

Recipe FAQ for Gluten Free Furikake Salmon

Here are some common questions you may ask as you prepare these recipes:

Where Can I Purchase Furikake?

Depending on your location, it may be easy to find furikake locally in the world cuisine section of your own supermarket, or in an asian grocery store. Before you buy, make sure it is gluten free; I also recommend finding one that is free from MSG. 

Trader Joe’s has their own brand of inexpensive Nori Komi Furikake that can be found in store or online at a higher price. AoNori Goma Furikake Seasoning and Eden Foods Furikake Shake can both be found on Amazon. 

For this furikake salmon, choose a standard blend that contains nori, sesame seeds and maybe Bonito flakes. Bonito flakes add umami depth of flavor and are made from smoked, fermented, and dried bonito (skipjack tuna). Many furikake blends also contain varying amounts of salt, some do not.

Can I Use a Different Fish in This Recipe?

Sure. A fattier fish similar to salmon would work well in this recipe. I would consider using Arctic Char, Trout, or Grouper. Ahi tuna could be a good choice, too!

Do I Have to Use Wasabi & Sriracha?

No, but YES! Though listed as optional in the recipe, please DON’T be scared to use wasabi or sriracha here. Both add unique flavors!

If you are truly concerned about the potential for a nasal burn or too much spicy heat, the amounts used here are NOT TOO HOT. It is even kid-approved! 
-Still unsure? Simply cut the amount called for the recipe in half. Just don’t leave them out!

How Do I Know When Fish is Done Cooking?

This can be tricky and is a common reason why some people do not eat fish – for fear of not cooking it enough – or for fear of overcooking it.

From my experience in nutrition counseling, many people think they do not like fish because of a previous poor experience of being served undercooked or overcooked fish. But, truly – when you start with a great quality fillet and you cook it right, it is delicious!

To know when fish is done cooking, it should just begin to flake easily and should not look fleshy inside. It should appear mostly opaque and very moist throughout. 

When lightly pressing down on the top of the fillet with a fork, the fish should start to separate pretty easily along the lines on the top of the fillet.

If you want numbers, then use a meat thermometer. Every kitchen should have a meat thermometer that is easy to read to help achieve proper cooking temperatures and great tasting food!

The internal cooking temperature for fish should be at minimum 125°F-130°F in the center of the thickest portion of the fillet. (The fish will continue to cook a bit once removed from the heat source.)

How Should I Store Leftover Furikake Salmon Fillets?

Promptly store cooked furikake salmon in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days.

How Do I Reheat Leftover Cooked Salmon?

Cooked salmon can be served cold the next day if preferred.

Otherwise, to reheat salmon, think low and slow. Heating too fast at too high of heat can dry out this succulent fish and create a wave of fishy smells. 

For Best Reheating Results:
Preheat oven to 300°F. Tear off a piece of aluminum foil large enough to wrap salmon fillet(s) loosely. Lightly brush a patch of foil with oil (where salmon will lay) and place salmon on top; fold foil over and loosely wrap it so as not to disturb the topping. Reheat in preheated oven for 13-15 minutes, or longer for multiple fillets.

Yes, it’s OK to use the microwave (I know many of us lead jam-packed lives)…but please do so carefully so it doesn’t dry out and get all smelly!

To Reheat in the Microwave: 
Place one portion on a microwave-safe plate and cook at 50% power for 30-40 seconds. Remove salmon from microwave and gently flake it slightly with a fork. Place it back in the microwave and cook at 80% power for 45-60 seconds until steaming and hot throughout.

Can I Freeze Cooked Furikake Salmon Fillets?

Yes! This recipe can easily be frozen using the following steps. 

Line a baking sheet with plastic wrap. Place salmon fillets (leaving some space between each one) on prepared baking sheet and set inside a freezer for 60-90 minutes. Once topping is mostly frozen, wrap each fillet in plastic wrap and place in airtight container or plastic bag, or wrap in foil. Label package and freeze for up to 3 months. 

To Thaw Frozen Furikake Salmon – Unwrap each fillet and allow to thaw completely in the refrigerator for about 6 hours. Reheat thawed salmon as described above.

What to Serve with Furikake Salmon?

There are so many possibilities! 

For Dinner: 

-Serve furikake salmon with a crunchy asian-inspired salad and a Schar gluten free Ciabatta Roll (with butter) or Sandwich Roll (with seasoned dipping oil).

-This divine salmon dish is also wonderful with rice pilaf and grilled asparagus or steamed green beans or broccoli.

-We’ve also enjoyed furikake salmon with buttery sweet corn and sautéed garlicky mushrooms & kale.

-What to drink? Furikake salmon is just lovely with a glass of chardonnay, dry rosé, or sauvignon blanc! A citrusy-flavored seltzer water or low-fat milk is a great choice, too!

For Lunch or Dinner:
-Create a lovely mid-day or end-of-day luxury with furikake salmon taking center stage in my Furikake Salmon Rice Bowl or in my Furikake Salmon Salad recipe! Both recipes can be found above under the heading: “Make Enough Furikake Salmon for Leftovers!”

-I think this salmon would also be delectable in a hot bowl of vegetable-filled gluten free ramen!

Grilled Furikake Salmon Fillet on white plate garnished with diced radish and asian-inspired slaw to bottom right

Easy Furikake Salmon – Gluten Free

Furikake Salmon is a super simple dish with an elegant Japanese-Hawaiian flair. Salmon is topped with a flavor-filled creamy layer and seasoned with furikake, a Japanese all-purpose seasoning. It's uncomplicated, but the flavors are wonderfully complex!
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American, Japanese
Diet: Gluten Free
Keyword: dinner, easy, fish, furikake, gluten free, Hawaiian Salmon, Japanese, salmon
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Resting Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 32 minutes
Servings: 4
Calories: 232kcal

Equipment

  • Grill Pan for Outdoor Grill or Baking Sheet (for oven method)
  • Aluminum Foil
  • Small Bowl

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 pound fresh salmon fillet cut in half crosswise
  • fresh cracked black pepper to taste
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil mayonnaise or light mayonnaise
  • 1/2 tsp wasabi paste *check for gluten free (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp sriracha sauce *almost always gluten free, but check the label
  • 1 1/2 tsp finely sliced green onions
  • 2 1/2 tsp Nori Kome Furikake Japanese Multi-Purpose Seasoning *check for gluten free
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp finely chopped radish to garnish (optional)

Instructions

To GRILL Salmon

  • Prepare a grill pan by lining it with heavy-duty foil and lightly brush a patch with oil (where salmon will lay).
  • Preheat gas grill to high heat, 450°F to 550°F.
  • In a small bowl, combine light mayonnaise, wasabi paste, sriracha sauce, and sliced green onions; set aside.
  • Rinse salmon fillets with cool water and pat dry with a paper towel. Place salmon fillets (skin side down) on the prepared grill pan, taking note of salmon fillet thickness for proper cooking times (see step 6 below). Season to taste with fresh cracked black pepper.
  • Divide prepared mayonnaise mixture across salmon fillets, spreading to the edges of each. Sprinkle each fillet evenly with Nori Kame Furikake.
  • Grill over direct high heat, maintaining 500°F, until salmon just begins to flake easily* and does not appear fleshy inside. It should appear very moist.
    Take care not to overcook and use these general grilling reference times: 4-5 minutes per ½-inch thickness, 8-10 minutes per 1-inch thickness, or 13-15 minutes for 1 ½-inch thickness. If using a meat thermometer*, see NOTE below.
  • Remove salmon fillets from foil to a warm plate and allow to rest about 2 minutes; then cut into 4 equal portions to serve.

To BAKE Salmon

  • Prepare a baking sheet with foil and lightly brush a patch with oil (where salmon will lay). Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • In a small bowl, combine light mayonnaise, wasabi paste, sriracha sauce, and sliced green onions; set aside.
  • Rinse salmon fillets with cool water and pat dry with a paper towel. Lay salmon fillets (skin side down) on the prepared pan. Season to taste with fresh cracked black pepper.
  • Divide prepared mayonnaise mixture across salmon fillets, spreading to the edges of each. Sprinkle each fillet evenly with Nori Kame Furikake.
  • Bake in prepared oven for 18-22 minutes or until salmon just begins to flake easily* and does not appear fleshy inside. It should appear very moist. Take care not to overcook. If using a meat thermometer*, see NOTE below.
  • Once removed from the oven, allow salmon to rest about 2 minutes; then cut into 4 equal portions to serve.

Notes

*Cooking Until Fish Flakes Easily – When lightly pressed down on the top of the fillet with a fork, the fish will separate pretty easily along the lines on the top of the fillet.
*If Using a Meat Thermometer – The internal cooking temperature should be a minimum of 125°F-130°F in the center of the thickest portion of the fillet. (The fish will continue to cook for a bit once removed from heat source.) 
*Wasabi, Sriracha, & Furikake – There are many options to choose from, but most importantly check labels to ensure they are gluten free. Safe brands I recommend cooks to consider: 
S&B Prepared Wasabi  
Huy Fong Sriracha Sauce or Lee Kum Kee Sriracha Sauce
Trader Joe’s Nori Komi Furikake, AoNori Goma Furikake Seasoning, or
Eden Foods Furikake Shake
Cooking, Storage, Substitution and Serving Tips: Please see FAQ in blog post above for tips.

Your Own Notes

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 5oz | Calories: 232kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 28g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 5g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 80mg | Sodium: 170mg | Potassium: 741mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 443IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 25mg | Iron: 1mg

I hope you love these easy gluten free Furikake Salmon Recipes. When you try any of them, please consider leaving a recipe rating and comment below!

Try My Other Main Dishes!

Gluten Free Chili

Gluten Free Chicken Noodle Soup
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Pinterest graphic of cooked furikake salmon fillet at top + furikake salmon rice bowl on rattan placemat at bottom left and furikake salmon salad on rattan placemat at bottom right

Tell me: What other ways do you enjoy salmon?

Julie Christensen

Julie Christensen, RD, LD is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian with over eleven years of experience in the field of dietetics, specializing in Wellness and Disease Prevention, Heart Health, Weight Management, and Celiac Disease. She holds a dual Bachelor of Science degree in Dietetics and Nutrition, Fitness, & Health as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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